You know nothing.

Guest Post by Nobandile:

Some tips on Surviving University:

“We know hindsight is always 20/20, but it becomes particularly practical when that hindsight can be used to benefit someone else’s foresight. It’s easy to say “If I’d only known this” or “Things would have been different had I known that” when referring to the decisions we made in college, but graduates have the unique opportunity to change the experiences of college newbies. We asked HuffPost editors to share the advice they would give to their freshmen selves, and hopefully those in or new to college will learn lessons from our hindsight.

Don’t let the fact that a class starts as early as 9 a.m. deter you from taking it. (We could’ve been such good friends, Art History … ) -Lance Gould, Executive Education Editor

Ask that guy out. Seriously. (Backstory: I’m engaged to the guy I had a crush on in college. The feeling was mutual, but we went over six years without finding that little piece of information out. Could have saved tons of trouble on that one.) Also, never cut your own hair. Or let a friend do it. -Brie Dyas, Senior Editor, HuffPost Style/Home

If this is for me upon graduation: You know nothing. Good luck. -Mike Sacks, Host/Producer HuffPost Live

Calm down. Don’t get Zooey Deschanel-esque bangs. Stop procrastinating. When you go to a party, don’t throw your black North Face behind the couch with everyone else’s.-Taylor Trudon, Associate Editor, HuffPost Teen

Budget and avoid credit cards. It’s OK to not go out on the weekends or on “Thirsty Thursdays,” but don’t beat yourself up for going out and having fun either. -Tyler Kingkade, Associate Editor, HuffPost College college class

Befriend people who make you feel good about yourself, who are kind to you and enrich your life in new ways and don’t hold you back. Don’t befriend those who you feel like you should be friends with because everyone else is. Those tend to then take you for granted, because they have friends to spare. -Liat Kornowski, Associate Editor, Celebrity

Value the friends you have, because at the end of it, they’re all you’ll have. You may not realize it now, but they have and will having everything to do with who you will grow up to be. -Nile Cappello, Editorial Fellow

You will not make as much money as you think you will after graduating. -Robin Wilkey, Editor of HuffPost San Francisco

If your student loans are starting to look like they’re going to be around 17.5K a year and you plan on pursuing anything other than finance and don’t have any brilliant patents pending, know this: 17.5k x 4 years = 70K. Sallie Mae will likely give you 30 years, at most, to pay all of that back. Given the 30 years, your monthly payments will likely be about $700 per month. -Brynn Mannino, Homepage Editor, AOL.com

Adulthood is overrated, because after you somehow manage to make it through those weeks that feel like finals week, you don’t get those awesome things called winter, spring or summer breaks to decompress. -Danielle Cadet, Black Voices Editor

Don’t be afraid to go out of your comfort zone. Try new things. Remember everyone is in the same boat as you are and they’re just as nervous! -Debra Lipson, Editorial Fellow

Actually go to class! Each class costs roughly $350 — that’s like a month’s worth of groceries. Plus you’ll never get to just soak in cool information like that ever again. -Carly Schwartz, Deputy National Editor

Advertisements

Slapping Waiters

Hi Class!

So, today we began our focus on how to approach review writing. I think we had quite a useful discussion (except for that rather amusing tangent involving pearlenta during) .

We looked at quite a few reviews and many ironic examples. By the way, you can go look at the Three Wolf Moon T-shirt wikipedia page here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Wolf_Moon

All these were meant as an amusing segue into the real substance of review writing. We’re going to be talking a lot about the formal aspects of reviews. But as we go through the week, I want us to think about what would constitute a really useful review. And what would constitute a very entertaining review. In the comments below, can you tell me what you would find useful in a review, say, of a product you were thinking of buying or of a hotel you were thinking of visiting?

See you all tomorrow!

Best,

Making a start.

Guest Post by Nothixo
Featured Image is “The Graduate” by Norman Rockwell

In class we have started looking at writings that give advice. The following is the first part of a speech ,taken from ‘writemypapers.org’, giving advice to students who are starting high school.
Comment on the language and style used to achieve its purpose.

“My Advice for First Steps in High School I sincerely congratulate you on your admission to start high school. As you begin, I invite you to ask yourself the following questions: What is my overall goal in this school? What friends will I have? Will I participate in extracurricular activities? How will I respond to my teachers and relate to my colleagues? Think deeply about these. Pause for a moment to give answers to some or all of them. And see if you can align your responses with my advice. High school calls for more responsibility from you than was required in lower grades. Now is the time to see life more clearly and get closer to choosing your interests. Education at this stage offers you an opportunity to discover yourself: explore it. Build on your strengths while you work hard on diminishing your weaknesses. I strongly advise you to set specific goals for yourself. Define your academic objectives. Aim to be the best student in your class throughout the grades. Start preparing for college. Write down these goals as you want them and post your write-up where you can always see it. You may also want to participate in one or two extracurricular activities, go ahead. Get as many awards as you can both in class and on the playing field. Look for friends that share these goals, and cooperate with them. Develop a team spirit as you work with your friends will help you later in life.”

Wear Sunscreen.

Hello Class!

This week we will be focusing a lot about writing advice. In these writing tasks, it is important to consider both your tone and audience. I’ve found another piece of writing from a column for you, an essay entitled “Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young”. It was written Mary Schmich for the Chicago Tribune and is most commonly known by the title Wear Sunscreen. It was set to music by Australian Director Baz Luhrmann (The guy who directed that adaption of The Great Gatsby with a film score by Jay-Z). We’re going to listen to this Baz Luhrmann version, but here is the original essay for you to look at. Tell me in the comments below about the tone and audience:

Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young

by Mary Schmich

“Inside every adult lurks a graduation speaker dying to get out, some world-weary pundit eager to pontificate on life to young people who’d rather be Rollerblading. Most of us, alas, will never be invited to sow our words of wisdom among an audience of caps and gowns, but there’s no reason we can’t entertain ourselves by composing a Guide to Life for Graduates.

I encourage anyone over 26 to try this and thank you for indulging my attempt.Ladies and gentlemen of the class of ’97:

Wear sunscreen.

If I could offer you only one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it. The long-term benefits of sunscreen have been proved by scientists, whereas the rest of my advice has no basis more reliable than my own meandering experience. I will dispense this advice now.

Enjoy the power and beauty of your youth. Oh, never mind. You will not understand the power and beauty of your youth until they’ve faded. But trust me, in 20 years, you’ll look back at photos of yourself and recall in a way you can’t grasp now how much possibility lay before you and how fabulous you really looked. You are not as fat as you imagine.

Don’t worry about the future. Or worry, but know that worrying is as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum. The real troubles in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, the kind that blindside you at 4 p.m. on some idle Tuesday.

Do one thing every day that scares you.

Sing.

Don’t be reckless with other people’s hearts. Don’t put up with people who are reckless with yours.

Floss.

Don’t waste your time on jealousy. Sometimes you’re ahead, sometimes you’re behind. The race is long and, in the end, it’s only with yourself.

Remember compliments you receive. Forget the insults. If you succeed in doing this, tell me how.

Keep your old love letters. Throw away your old bank statements.

Stretch.

Don’t feel guilty if you don’t know what you want to do with your life. The most interesting people I know didn’t know at 22 what they wanted to do with their lives. Some of the most interesting 40-year-olds I know still don’t.

Get plenty of calcium. Be kind to your knees. You’ll miss them when they’re gone.

Maybe you’ll marry, maybe you won’t. Maybe you’ll have children, maybe you won’t. Maybe you’ll divorce at 40, maybe you’ll dance the funky chicken on your 75th wedding anniversary. Whatever you do, don’t congratulate yourself too much, or berate yourself either. Your choices are half chance. So are everybody else’s.

Enjoy your body. Use it every way you can. Don’t be afraid of it or of what other people think of it. It’s the greatest instrument you’ll ever own.

Dance, even if you have nowhere to do it but your living room.

Read the directions, even if you don’t follow them.

Do not read beauty magazines. They will only make you feel ugly.

Get to know your parents. You never know when they’ll be gone for good. Be nice to your siblings. They’re your best link to your past and the people most likely to stick with you in the future.

Understand that friends come and go, but with a precious few you should hold on. Work hard to bridge the gaps in geography and lifestyle, because the older you get, the more you need the people who knew you when you were young.

Live in New York City once, but leave before it makes you hard. Live in Northern California once, but leave before it makes you soft. Travel.

Accept certain inalienable truths: Prices will rise. Politicians will philander. You, too, will get old. And when you do, you’ll fantasize that when you were young, prices were reasonable, politicians were noble and children respected their elders.

Respect your elders.

Don’t expect anyone else to support you. Maybe you have a trust fund. Maybe you’ll have a wealthy spouse. But you never know when either one might run out.

Don’t mess too much with your hair or by the time you’re 40 it will look 85.

Be careful whose advice you buy, but be patient with those who supply it. Advice is a form of nostalgia. Dispensing it is a way of fishing the past from the disposal, wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts and recycling it for more than it’s worth.

But trust me on the sunscreen.”