A Matter of Perspective

Guest Post by Rebecca

A point of view switch can be quite an entertaining way to describe a situation but in the eyes of another person and visualise how they experienced a specific situation. It is very important to pay attention to detail and not make things up along the way even though the situation is being described and explained by someone else. I found a poem whose poet is not named but did make an excellent example of describing what he or she sees someone else’s point of view. In the comments can you say why the point of view switch is effective?

POINT OF VIEW

Thanksgiving dinner’s sad and thankless
Christmas dinner’s dark and blue
When you stop and try to see it
From the turkey’s point of view

Sunday dinner isn’t sunny
Easter feasts are just bad luck
When you see it from the viewpoint
Of a chicken or a duck.

Oh how I once loved tuna salad
Pork and lobsters, lamb chops too
Till I stopped and looked at dinner
From the dinner’s point of view.

Advertisements

18 Comments

  1. I enjoyed this poem. It made me think of a few things in a different view for example, how a chair is comfortable for me but from the chairs point of view, it’s being squished.
    That’s what I think the effect of this poem. It helps you recognise to look at all sorts of point of views, even of inanimate objects.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  2. Very effective rhythm it is very fluid. The point of view shift serves to entertain in a dark humorous way that like what Cameron said, you start to look at things at a different angle. With the use of words like ”thankless” and ”dark and blue” the poem has a very sad atmosphere to it.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  3. I like the rythm of this poem very much it flows. This poem also allows us to look at things in two ways, our point of view and another point of view as Camaron and Nobandile have said. It creates a bit of a dreary feeling as well as a sad atmosphere.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  4. Wow! This extract is Brillient, in the sense that you understand where the writer comes from. Because the dinners we eat, is the death of an animal, the pain they suffered, just to be a piece of meat on our plates. This actually makes me imagine of a sitation in a series called, “13 reasons why” Where everyone around the girl thinks that she is so happy and loves life, but when you look at life from her point of view, it is anything but happy. It makes you think of how you treat other people, can actually really effect their lives. Putting yourself in other peoples shoes is an important way to understand life. Writing a Point of view switch, it is very important to look at their point of view very closely and understand it. This was a very good extract overall and makes you think of how you effect other things around you!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

    1. NO 13 REASONS WHY COMMENTS UNTIL I HAVE FINISHED THE SERIES, JESS!!
      But yes, the process you’re articulating so nicely is “defamiliarisation” where you make something unfamiliar to you for effect.

      Like

      Reply

  5. The POV switches when a new stanza is written. The most effective POV to me, is the turkey because thanksgiving is a well known holiday and turkey is the “focus” of the dinner. It makes you feel sad for the turkey because it is being eaten by humans who enjoy it, but the turkey’s life is not considered. The poem has good rhythm and the meaning is obvious.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

    1. Good Dani! The defamiliarisation of the Point of View switch is very effective! However, like I said to Jess on another comment, make sure in your commentary that you don’t throw out words like “good” to describe a language feature without answering the questions “GOOD FOR WHAT PURPOSE?”

      Like

      Reply

  6. It makes it rather sad and also makes it sound as if Christmas is rather a dark “mystery”. The POV switch is effetive because thanksgiving is a well known celebration in countries such as America.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s